The National Museum of
American Jewish Military History

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Hall of Heroes:American Jewish Recipients of The Medal of Honor

CAPTAIN WALTER I. BERLIN

Distinguished Service Cross

Captain Walter I. Berlin of Baltimore, MD, received the Distinguished Service Cross, Silver Star, Bronze Star with three Oak–Leaf Clusters, Purple Heart with two Oak–Leaf Clusters, and Army Commendation Medal, along with many other medals and citations throughout his impressive career in which he served in two wars—WWII and Korea.

His Distinguished Service Cross citation reads: “When devastating machine gun and rifle fire from hostile pillboxes pinned his company to the ground after it had advanced half the distance across a 1500 yard exposed area, First Lieutenant Berlin braved the hail of lead and reached a friendly tank 150 yards away. Climbing atop the tank, he directed its movements to a position from which deadly fire was placed upon the pillbox, completely destroying it. Through he was constantly subjected to heavy fire, he remained in his exposed position and directed effective tank fire until all enemy emplacements were knocked out, thus permitting his company to advance and seize its objective.”

Captain Berlin remained in the Army after the war and retired as a Lieutenant Colonel in 1968. He is listed in the Infantry Officer Candidate School's Hall of Fame.


LIEUTENANT JACK H. BLUMBERG

Distinguished Service Cross

In a night attack on a strongly fortified Nazi position on the Italian front, Lieutenant Jack Blumberg led a patrol of six men to protect the right flank of his battalion. In the face of heavy fire from the enemy, Lieutenant Blumberg located and destroyed two Nazi machine gun nests. But on the return trip to his own lines, a Nazi sniper fired a shot from a dugout that killed him instantly.


LIEUTENANT HOWARD CARDOZA

Distinguished Service Cross

Lt. Cardoza, of Greenville, Georgia, was given a Distinguished Service Cross for exceptional valor during the Korean War. Under a hail of enemy fire, he succeeded in bringing much need ammunition to an isolated American position.


MAJOR MAX CLARK

Navy Cross

Major Max Clark of Galveston, Texas lost his life fighting in the Pacific with the Marines. Major Clark was described by Col. William T. Clement as " a human dynamo and absolutely fearless." His Navy Cross citation reads:

"For distinguished service in the line of his profession during the enemy attacks on the Navy Yard, Cavite, and the Naval Air Station at Sangley Point, Philippine Islands, between December 10th and 19th, 1941."


MAJOR HAROLD COHEN

Distinguished Service Cross

In 1945 a recommendation was made for a Distinguished Service Cross for his bravery during fighting,. Somehow, it was lost. In 1996, General Abrams´s biographer mentioned Cohen´s story to Lt. Colonel Fred Borch, who reopened the case, resulting in the awarding of the medal. The citation reads:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lieutenant Colonel Harold Cohen, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with the 10th Armored Infantry Battalion, 4th Armored Division, in action against enemy forces on 25 February 1945, in Germany. When the situation became untenable during the battalion´s attack upon Brecht, Germany, because of small arms, artillery and direct fire that came from all directions, Lieutenant Colonel Cohen took a position on high ground in plain view of the enemy and oblivious to all danger and constant fire that fell all about him directed tank fire, lifted friendly artillery fire that was falling too close and by personal bravery, inspiring leadership and tactical skill retained the initiative and gained the important objective. Lieutenant Colonel Cohen´s intrepid actions and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 4th Armored Division, and the United States Army.


PRIVATE MARC C. DAUBER

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Private Marc C. Dauber (ASN: 32694428), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, in action against enemy forces in Germany, on 18 November 1944. During action near Hamich, Germany, Private Dauber assumed command of his platoon when the platoon and squad leaders became casualties. He led a group of men into the town, silenced a German machine gun with a grenade, courageously advanced alone on a second machine gun nest and eliminated that position with rifle fire. He continued to lead his men until nightfall when the enemy counterattacked and surrounded his platoon. Although seriously wounded he defended his position with heroic determination against overwhelming odds until he was killed. Private Dauber´s inspirational leadership and supreme devotion to duty at the cost of his life, exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.


CORPORAL LEROY DIAMOND

Navy Cross

Corporal Diamond of Brooklyn served with the Marines. He was leader of a three-man squad in a machine-gun nest who thwarted an enemy advance during the early fighting on Guadalcanal, piling up more than 200 dead during the battle. One of the group was killed, another blinded. Diamond was wounded but recovered and received the Navy Cross for the action.

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